Drupal Planet

Mobomo: Drupal vs WordPress: Which is Better for Your Business?

1 month 2 weeks ago

Like many developers, some of our first websites were built on the backbones of WordPress. It’s the hyper-popular king of content management systems. It has name recognition, an overflowing user base, and plenty of third-party integrations that help cut your development time. But, over the years, we’ve migrated almost exclusively to Drupal. So why did we switch? What is it about Drupal that leaves developers drooling? And why would anyone pick Drupal — which has around 1.3 million users — over WordPress —which has over 400 million users? Today, we’re going to compare David to Goliath. Why is Drupal, the third most active CMS behind WordPress and Joomla, a good choice for businesses looking to build a refreshing, impactful, and feature-rich website?

UNDERSTANDING THE CORE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN DRUPAL AND WORDPRESS

By far, the most significant difference between WordPress and Drupal is the overall development need. WordPress is simple. There are hundreds of thousands of third-party plugins that you can leverage to build an entire website with virtually no coding or developing knowledge. And, that’s the single biggest reason that WordPress is so massive. Anyone can build a WordPress site. It’s easy. Drupal requires development. If you want to build a Drupal website, you’re going to have to hire some developers. So, naturally, Drupal has fewer overall users. But, it’s essential to make that distinction. Drupal is built for businesses, public entities, and enterprises. WordPress is built for your everyday website. It’s important to keep this main difference in mind. It’s this difference that resonates throughout these core pillars. And, it’s this core difference that creates pros and cons for each platform.

DRUPAL VS. WORDPRESS: SECURITY, FLEXIBILITY, AND SCALABILITY

We consider security, flexibility, and scalability to be the three primary pillars of a CMS. An amazing designer can make a fantastic template or theme regardless of the CMS. And ease-of-use is relative to your plugins/modules, familiarity with the platform, and overall development capabilities. So those are both highly subjective. Security, flexibility, and scalability aren’t subjective; they are what they are.

SECURITY

WordPress has a security problem. Alone, WordPress accounts for 90% of all hacked websites that use a CMS. There’s a tradeoff that comes with leveraging third-party plugins to build websites. You increase your threat landscape. WPScan Vulnerability Database shows 21,675 vulnerabilities in WordPress’s core and with third-party plugins. This security vulnerability issue has been an ongoing headache for WordPress from the start. If we do a play-by-play, year-over-year of WordPress’s history, we see an ongoing and consistent security issue:

  • 2013: 70% of the top 40,000 most popular WordPress websites were vulnerable to hackers
  • 2014: SoakSoak compromises +100,000 websites, a massive DDOS attack hits 160,000 websites, and All In One SEO Pack puts +19 million sites at risk.
  • 2015: A core vulnerability puts millions of websites at risk, Akismet opens millions of websites to hackers, and YoastSEO puts over 14 million websites in hackers’ crosshairs.
  • 2016: At this point, millions of hacks are happening every week across plugins. Check out this WordFence weekly update during this period.
  • 2017: The hacks continue. The average small business website using WordPress is attacked 44 times a day at this point, and WordPress websites are 2x more likely to be hacked than other CMS.

The list goes on. Year-over-year, more vulnerabilities happen across WordPress. And this is an important point. WordPress has subpar security by design. It’s the tradeoff they made to build an ecosystem that doesn’t require development. We aren’t saying that the core of WordPress is inherently security-stripped. It’s not. But, given the scale, scope, and third-party-fanatic nature of the platform, it’s weak on security by nature. Drupal, on the other hand, is the opposite. Websites require development time, each website is customized to the user, and building a website takes time and patience. The tradeoff is better security. Drupal has built-in enterprise-scale security, and you don’t rely on a hotchpotch of third-party applications to build your website’s functionality. There’s a reason that NASA, the White House, and other government entities use (or used) Drupal. It has better security. We want to take a second to make the distinction. WordPress has a secure core. We would argue that Drupal has a more secure core. But the difference isn’t massive. WordPress’s security vulnerabilities are a product of its reliance on third-party applications to make a functional website.

FLEXIBILITY

WordPress is more flexible than Drupal to some users. And Drupal is more flexible than WordPress to some users. That may sound complicated. But it comes down to your development capabilities. Drupal has more features than WordPress. Its core is filled with rich taxonomies, content blocks, and unique blocks than WordPress. But, if you aren’t experienced, you probably won’t find and/or use many of these functionalities. On the surface, WordPress has more accessible features. At the core, Drupal is the single most feature-rich CMS on the planet. So, for businesses (especially public entities and larger enterprises), Drupal has a more robust architecture to tackle large-scale projects that have hyper-specific needs. For small businesses and personal website owners, WordPress is easier to use and requires far less development experience to tap into its functionalities, features, and flexibility.

SCALABILITY

Drupal has better scalability. This one isn’t a competition. Again, this comes down to the dev-heavy nature of the platform. To scale WordPress websites, you add more plugins. To scale Drupal websites, you develop more. There’s a key practical difference here. Drupal modules, taxonomies, and content blocks all exist in the same ecosystem. Each WordPress plugin is its own micro-ecosystem. So, with WordPress, most users are stringing together a ton of third-party ecosystems in an attempt to create one overarching website. Also, Drupal is built for enterprise-scale projects. So there’s backend support and a large landscape of community support around large-scale projects. WordPress is a catch-all CMS that has a little of everything. If WordPress is a Swiss army knife, Drupal is a custom, hand-forged bread knife — explicitly designed to help you scale, slice, and butter larger projects.

ARE YOU READY TO DEVELOP YOUR PERFECT DRUPAL WEBSITE?

At Mobomo, we specialize in Drupal development projects. Our agile-based team of top-level design, development, and support talent can help you launch and scale your website to fit your unique needs. From NASA to Great Minds, we help private and public entities build dreams and execute visions.

Contact us to learn more.

The post Drupal vs WordPress: Which is Better for Your Business? appeared first on .

Specbee: Top Drupal 8 (and 9) Modules for Intuitive Website Navigation

1 month 2 weeks ago
Top Drupal 8 (and 9) Modules for Intuitive Website Navigation Shefali Shetty 04 Aug, 2020 Top 10 best practices for designing a perfect UX for your mobile app

What’s the secret sauce to a successful website? Well, there are more than 10 factors I can think of right off the bat. Like an attractive design, page-load speed, quality of content, marketing efforts and more.  One significant yet often overlooked element for a great user experience that drives a successful website is an intuitive navigation. Drupal 8 has a great set of modules to improve the navigation structure of your website. We have curated a list of top Drupal 8 (and 9) modules that enable easy and intuitive website navigation. Read on to find out.


A good website navigation lets site visitors know exactly where to get their information from as soon as they land on your website. Conversely, bad website navigation damages your rate of conversions and increases bounce rates. A website with attractive design does not always mean that navigating through it is intuitive. I have seen websites with ordinary designs with great navigation structures. And I keep going back to them because I know I can get what I need without scampering all over the place. According to CrazyEgg, the thumb rule is that it shouldn’t take more than 3 clicks for your user to find what they need.

Elements for an Intuitive Website Navigation

Your website visitors should be able to navigate from one page to another smoothly without getting distracted or confused. Distracted or confused users will leave your website before you establish a connection with them. Having a great design is good but if your visitors are not able to find your contact form, there is no point, is there? So, what makes up for a good navigation structure? 

1.    Main Navigation Bars 

This is the most crucial navigation element of a website. It is a horizontal (sometimes vertical) bar that lists links to point visitors around your website. A good main navigation bar needs to be simple, short, consistent, helpful, and catchy.


2.    Breadcrumbs

These helpful navigational aids help site visitors to identify where they exactly are. They are a trail of links that starts from the parent page and ends with the current page, usually separated with a “>” or a “/” symbol.

3.    Multi-column Menus (and Submenus)

A more complex website with tons of branches and sub-branches should use multi-column menus. Again, these menus should be simple and easy to navigate through. 

4.    Sitemaps

Often considered as just an SEO booster, Sitemaps are extremely helpful as a navigation aid as well. A typical Sitemap should display a hierarchical structure of the entire website.


5.    CTA (Call To Action) Buttons

This is where all the action actually happens! Proper placement of these CTA buttons play an important role amongst others like color, font style, size, text, etc.


6.    Sidebars

This is a good place to add page-specific links to enhance the UX for your site visitors. Good sidebars should be simple, not too long, contain a CTA and be ordered appropriately.


7.    Hyperlinks

Here we are talking more about internal linking than external. A hyperlink should be intuitive and lead the visitor to the page they expect (no surprises please). Although having internal links are good for SEO, don’t over-do it or you may risk losing their focus on the page.  

8.    Footers

Footers are easy to ignore and are often used only to display only copyright details. The myth that people don’t scroll till the end of a page is now busted. A typical footer should contain links that you are not able to display in the header or sidebar sections. It could also have your contact details as well as mailing list sign up mini forms.

Top Drupal 8 (and 9) Modules for Intuitive Navigation 1.    Menu Block 

The Drupal 8 Menu Block module’s design follows Drupal’s standard tree navigation style but  provides more enhanced features than the ones offered in the core Menu modules. You can easily configure blocks of menu links and specify the level you want to start and end with. There is no limit to the number of levels you can display. You can choose to keep your child menu elements expanded. Some basic features of this module are ported to Drupal 8 core. The Menu block module also supports Drupal 9.


2.    Easy Breadcrumb

The Drupal 8 Easy Breadcrumb module works by extracting location segments from the current URL of the webpage. It offers tons of configurable options and can replace the existing Drupal breadcrumbs module. You can choose to completely hide the home page link or any other specified links. The Easy breadcrumb module supports Drupal 9 too!


3.    Superfish

The Drupal 8 Superfish module is ideal when you have large and multiple layered, multi-column drop down menus. The module integrates with the jQuery Superfish plugin which is a highly versatile menu plugin that works for touchscreens, screen-readers and other keyboard interactions. It can be configured to add time delays on mouse-out, animations, hide and reveal menu links, adds arrows if submenus are detected, and much more. It is also Drupal 9 compatible.


4.    Sitemap

The Drupal 8 Sitemap module is simple, clean and easy to use. It can display the entire site structure in a clean hierarchical structure. You can also choose to generate and display RSS feeds for blogs and categories. The Sitemap module supports Drupal 9.


5.    Menu Item Role Access

This module allows you to add access control to your menus. You can enable and disable menu items depending on user roles. The Drupal 8 Menu Item Role Access module allows you to enter the role field (optional) to the menu items. It also supports Drupal 9.

          Image source: Menu Item Role Access
6.    Cheeseburger Menu

If you thought hamburger menus were great, wait till you check out the Cheeseburger menu. The Drupal 8 Cheeseburger menu module comes with some great features and is not just limited to mobile view, it also works with desktop views and varied screen sizes as well. It gives you the flexibility to choose the menu items that you want to appear in the Cheeseburger menu and also edit the menu titles. If you’re using Drupal Commerce, you can choose to display the shopping cart or the store phone number in the menu. Taxonomies could be chosen as the structure for your Cheeseburger menu. The Cheeseburger menu module supports Drupal 9 too!

 
Image source : Cheeseburger menu

 

7.    Simplify Menu

The Drupal 8 Simplify Menu module lets you render menus in your Twig template. It allows customization of the menu markup that enables accessibility and compatible with standards. You can render your menu tree as an array in the twig template and have full control over on the menu’s array. This module does not support Drupal 9 yet.



8.    Total Control Admin Dashboard

The Drupal 8 Total Control Admin Dashboard is a useful administrative navigation tool. It acts as a centralized hub for all administration tools. The dashboard displays admin panes and quick links to users, taxonomies, menus, content types, site stats, views panel panes and more. The views panel panes can be further customized. This module also works with Drupal 9.

9.    Footermap: a footer site map

As the name suggests, the Drupal 8 Footermap module provides a sitemap for your Drupal website that can be placed in the footer block. It allows dynamic generation of a sitemap and can be easily configured to support translation and caching. You can choose the menus to display, set the menu level limit (child menus), enable menu heading, edit the CSS to match your site layout and much more. The Footermap module also works with Drupal 9.


 

There are tons of benefits of having a good and intuitive website navigation system. When your visitors get the information they need without having to wander around for long, they will come back to you for more. Analytics tools and AB testing tools can be used to analyze and tweak the navigation elements of your website to help improve your existing navigation system. Drupal enables an engaging and intuitive navigation experience with its many core and contributed modules, some of which are listed above. As a leading Drupal development company, we strive to provide our customers with websites that are highly engaging and drives results. Connect with us today to see how we can help you with your next Drupal project.

Drupal Planet Drupal Module Drupal 8 Drupal Tutorial Shefali ShettyApr 05, 2017 Subscribe For Our Newsletter And Stay Updated Subscribe

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Agaric Collective: Double-edged Raiser: Past time to ditch Blackbaud

1 month 2 weeks ago

I have watched in sadness and sometimes anger as large non-profit after large non-profit collectively poured enough money into Raiser's Edge and other Blackbaud licenses and consulting services to fund many feature enhancements for the main FLOSS alternative, CiviCRM— improvements which would then be free for everyone, forever.

I have never met anyone who actually likes Blackbaud products and services. However, many organizations felt they were the only safe option, in the sense of claiming to have everything an enterprise needs.

Now, Blackbaud failed to secure its servers sufficiently and large amounts of its clients' donor data, including personally identifying information, was obtained in a ransomware attack. This was back in May. Blackbaud ultimately paid the ransomer to allegedly destroy the data they obtained— and only late in July finally told their customers what happened.

As the American Civil Liberties Union wrote to all its supporters, current and past (including myself), this is a rotten situation:

In all candor, we are frustrated with the lack of information we've received from Blackbaud about this incident thus far. The ACLU is doing everything in our power to ascertain the full nature of the breach, and we are actively investigating the nature of the data that was involved, details of the incident, and Blackbaud's remediation plans.

We are also exploring all options to ensure this does not happen again, including revisiting our relationship with Blackbaud.

Fortunately, none of Agaric's clients are affected. But we hope everyone using or considering using Blackbaud and other proprietary services for their most important data will look at free/libre open source solutions. Code you (or your technology partner) can see and contribute to means you truly can do anything. And if you put aside the money that would be gouged out of your organization by the eTapestry, Kintera, and Convio-swallowing monopolist Blackbaud, you probably can afford to.

At Agaric, we have recently been working with CiviCRM more recently (building on experience dating back fifteen years!) and we know our friends at Palante Technology Cooperative and myDropWizard are well-versed in CiviCRM, as are many others. Please consider this when weighing your options for maintaining a strong, ethical relationship with your supporters, and let us know if you have any thoughts or questions!

Read more and discuss at agaric.coop.

rachel_norfolk: Wanting to add a little darkness

1 month 2 weeks ago
Wanting to add a little darkness Rachel Mon, 08/03/2020 - 13:34

The huge, huge advantage of using an off-the-shelf, soon-to-be-core theme is that the quality is high, like really high. 

Of course, there is always a possibility I would want to add something (and I have an idea for a little animation in the back of my mind) so I wanted to find a way to do that without making any changes to the actual theme.

When Lewis Nyman tweeted about a funky little way to add a "dark mode", I saw my opportunity...

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LakeDrops Drupal Consulting, Development and Hosting: The ultimate subscription and notification solution for Drupal

1 month 2 weeks ago
The ultimate subscription and notification solution for Drupal Jürgen Haas Mon, 08/03/2020 - 13:41

Almost all websites have one requirement in common: getting notified when something specific is happening. Whether that's a new blog post, a new comment, a modified version of a node, an exception in the logs or a deleted user account, either the site admin or website visitors would like to know about some or all of these.

Shivan Jaikaran: Composer Memory Problem on Shared Web Hosting

1 month 2 weeks ago
Composer Memory Problem on Shared Web Hosting admin Mon, 08/03/2020 - 04:27

If you are using shared web hosting for your composer managed Drupal website, you have probably ran into the problem of your server running out of memory for simple commands such as "composer install". Shared web hosting usually have memory limits which are shared across many websites.

This problem becomes quickly apparent if you are trying to install a new Drupal website into your shared hosting account. Because this is probably the first time that you have to run "composer install" for this website. Composer will then have to go and fetch all the files and download them into your vendor directory. This process is memory intensive. The end result is your process is abruptly killed without finishing.

Solution

A quick and easy solution is to install the site locally whereby you can successfully run "composer install". You would then have the vendor directory locally. Then use a service like FTP to manually upload the vendor folder into the correct directory on your hosting server. Then on your hosting server, try running "composer install" again. 

At this point, composer would not need to fetch all the files again. Composer may or may not have to update some files in the vendor directory. This is OK. But the process should now be able to complete within your memory limitations.

It should be noted that the vendor directory should not be committed to your git directory for a few important reasons.

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Mark Shropshire: Drupal Camp Asheville Talk on Upgrading Projects to Drupal 9

1 month 3 weeks ago

Drupal Camp Asheville was quite different this year, as it transitioned from an in-person event to virtual. While I missed driving up to Asheville, NC and hanging out, it was encouraging to meet new people and see the camp's reach extend internationally! Thanks to all who made this year's event especially great!

I was honored to have a chance to speak on upgrading projects from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 compatibility, by demonstrating techniques and open source tools used by the community. A primary goal of the talk, "Anyone Can Help Upgrade Drupal Projects to Be Drupal 9 Compatible!", was to show how anyone who wants to help contribute to Drupal 9 upgrades can! This was accomplished by showing that not all Drupal 9 audit tools require developer knowledge, demonstration of the Drupal issue queue, and additional documentation resources provided in the presentation slides.

I thought the most fun part of the day was the live audit, patch testing, and release of a Drupal 9 compatible version of User Password Reset Link Timeout. While the actual release happened a few minutes after the end of the presentation, the demonstration shows a bit about using the issue queue, testing a patch, committing the patch, and pushing up a new tag for release. I just love the energy of live demonstrations!

A page with links to the slides and video can be found here.

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DrupalEasy: DrupalEasy Podcast 236 - AmyJune Hineline (virtual Drupal events)

1 month 3 weeks ago

Direct .mp3 file download.

AmyJune Hineline, community ambassador at Kanopi Studios, joins Mike Anello to talk about virtual Drupal events.

URLs mentioned DrupalEasy News Audio transcript

We're using the machine-driven Amazon Transcribe service to provide an audio transcript of this episode.

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OSTraining: OSTips-How To Easily Replace Media In Drupal 8

1 month 3 weeks ago

One of the great things about Drupal's new media manager is the ability to easily see all the media you're using on your website.

What if you want to replace one of those images or even more likely a PDF that needs to be updated?

Well in this OSTip, I'm going to show you how.

Let's go!

imalabya.co: Adding classes to Drupal Link field

1 month 3 weeks ago
Adding classes to Drupal Link field

I recently came across a situation where I had to add a class to a link field in a content type. Now, this can be done using contributed modules like Link Attributes widget or Advance Link Attributes.

However, there was a small catch in the requirement. The extra class has to be added only for external URLs added via the Link field. Now, although updating the field widget to add an extra field for class seems to be a solution but it's not author-friendly when the users base are non-technical editors.

So, instead of adding any new module or a new field widget, I ended up writing a small preprocess for the field to check if the field item URL is external then add the external class.

/** * Implements hook_preprocess_field(). */ function mars_preprocess_field(&$variables) { $element = $variables['element']; // Check if the field is the target field. if ($element['#field_name'] == 'field_related_articles') { // Iterate through the field items. foreach($variables['items'] as $key => $item) { // Clone the \Drupal\Core\Url object to a variable. $url = clone $item['content']['#url']; // Check if the URL is external then add the class. if($url->isExternal()) { $variables['items'][$key]['content']['#options']['attributes']['class'][] = 'ext-link'; } } } }

This can be achieved using JavaScript as well by checking all the href attributes of the field items on load, but should be avoided. It's always better to look out if Drupal is providing any API or hook to do what is intended. Usage of JavaScript for such purposes should be used as a last resort.

malabya Thu, 07/30/2020 - 21:50 Drupal development

Mobomo: Must-Follow Considerations When Starting a Drupal-Based Project

1 month 3 weeks ago

Over 500,000 businesses leverage Drupal to launch their websites and projects. From NASA to Tesla, public and private institutions regularly rely on Drupal to launch large-scale websites capable of handling their development and visual needs. But, starting a Drupal project doesn’t guarantee success. In fact, 14% of all IT projects outright fail, 43% exceed their initial budgets, and 31% fail to meet their original goals! In other words, if you want to create a successful Drupal project, you need to prepare. Don’t worry! We’ve got your back. Here are 5 things to keep in mind when starting a Drupal-based project.

1. GATHER REQUIREMENTS FROM STAKEHOLDERS EARLY AND OFTEN

According to PMI, 39% of projects fail due to inadequate requirements. Believe it or not, requirement gathering is the single most important stage of project development. In fact, it’s the first step Drupal itself takes when pushing out new projects (see this scope document for their technical document project). Gathering requirements may sound easy, but it can be a time-consuming process. We recommend using SMART (Specific, Measurable, Agreed Upon, Realistic, Time-based) to map out your specific needs. If possible, involve the end-user during this stage. Don’t assume you know what users want; ask them directly. Internally, requirements gathering should rally nearly every stakeholder with hefty amounts of cross-collaboration between departments. You want to lean heavily on data, establish your benchmarks and KPIs early, and try to involve everyone regularly. The single biggest project mistake is acting like requirements are set-in-stone. If you just follow the initial requirements to a “T,” you may push out a poor project. You want to regularly ask questions, communicate issues, and rely on guidance from stakeholders and subject matter experts (SMEs) to guide your project to completion.

2. PLAN YOUR SDLC/WORKFLOW PIPELINE

We all have different development strategies. You may leverage freelancers, a best-in-class agency, or internal devs to execute your Drupal projects. Typically, we see a combination of two of the above. Either way, you have to set some software development lifecycle and workflow standards. This gets complex. On the surface, you should think about coding standards, code flow, databases, and repositories, and all of the other development needs that should be in sync across devs. But there’s also the deeper, more holistic components to consider. Are you going to use agile? Do you have a DevOps strategy? Are you SCRUM-based? Do you practice design and dev sprints? At Mobomo, we use an agile-hybrid development cycle to fail early, iterate regularly, and deploy rapidly. But that’s how we do things. You need to figure out how you want to execute your project. We’ve seen successful Drupal projects using virtually every workflow system out there. The way you work matters, sure. But getting everyone aligned under a specific way of working is more important. You can use the “old-school” waterfall methodology and still push out great projects. However, to do that, you need everyone on the same page.

3. USE SHIFT-LEFT TESTING FOR BUG AND VULNERABILITY DETECTION

Drupal is a secure platform. Of the four most popular content management systems, Drupal is the least hacked. But that doesn’t mean it’s impenetrable. You want to shift-left test (i.e., automate testing early and often in the development cycle). Drupal 8+ has PHPUnit built-in — taking the place of SimpleTest. You can use this to quickly test out code. You can perform unit tests, kernel tests, and functional tests with and without JavaScript. You can also use Nightwatch.js to run tests. Of course, you may opt for third-party automation solutions (e.g., RUM, synthetic user monitoring, etc.) The important thing is that you test continuously. There are three primary reasons that shift-left testing needs to be part of your development arsenal.

  • It helps prevent vulnerabilities. The average cost of a data breach is over $3 million. And it takes around 300 days to identify and contain website breaches.
  • It bolsters the user experience. A 100-millisecond delay in page load speed drops conversions by 7%. Meanwhile, 75% of users judge your credibility by your website’s design and performance, and 39% of users will stop engaging with your website if your images take too long to load. In other words, simple glitches can result in massive issues.
  • It reduces development headaches. Nothing is worse than developing out completely new features only to discover an error that takes you back to step 1.
4. GET HYPER-FAMILIAR WITH DRUPAL’S API

If you want to build amazing Drupal projects, you need to familiarize yourself with the Drupal REST API. This may sound like obvious advice. But understanding how Drupal’s built-in features, architecture, and coding flow can help you minimize mistakes and maximize your time-to-launch. The last thing you want to do is code redundantly when Drupal may automate some of that coding on its end. For more information on Drupal’s API and taxonomy, see Drupal API. We know! If you’re using Drupal, you probably have a decent idea of what its API looks like. But make sure that you understand all of its core features to avoid headaches and redundancies.

5. SET STANDARDS

Every development project needs standards. There are a million ways to build a website or app. But you can’t use all of those million ways together. You don’t want half of your team using Drupal’s built-in content builder and the other half using Gutenberg. Everyone should be on the same page. This goes for blocks, taxonomy, and every other coding need and task you’re going to accomplish. You need coding standards, software standards, and process standards to align your team to a specific framework. You can develop standards incrementally, but they should be shared consistently across teams. Ideally, you’ll build a standard for everything. From communication to development, testing, launching, and patching, you should have set-in-stone processes. In the past, this was less of an issue. But, with every developer rushing to agile, sprint-driven methodologies, it can be easy to lose sight of standards in favor of speed. Don’t let that happen. Agile doesn’t mean “willy-nilly” coding and development for the fastest possible launch. It still has to be systematic. Standards allow you to execute faster and smarter across your development pipeline.

NEED SOME HELP?

At Mobomo, we build best-in-class Drupal projects for brands across the globe. From NASA to UGS, we’ve helped private, and public entities launch safe, secure, and exciting Drupal solutions. Are you looking for a partner with fresh strategies and best-of-breed agile-driven development practices?

Contact us. Let’s build your dream project — together.

The post Must-Follow Considerations When Starting a Drupal-Based Project appeared first on .

Sooper Drupal Themes: Lessons from COVID-19: Learn to Update Your Drupal Website Fast Without IT Support

1 month 3 weeks ago

The new coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is more than a health crisis. As the infectious disease spreads across the world, it is leading to horrendous social, economic, and political crises that may last for the foreseeable future.

As lockdowns, physical distancing restrictions, and other measures were implemented to curb the spread of the dangerous virus, it led to an unprecedented shift in how things are done. Specifically, it disrupted the normal work environment in almost every industry, including the IT industry.

Companies that often relied on external IT support suddenly found their critical content and events pages outdated, as the external support team was overrun with requests from many other clients who needed their websites updated.

So, if there is one thing that has become clear during this pandemic it is the need to be self-sufficient. You don’t need to be hiring someone each time you want to update the design of your web page, customize images, or make any content changes to your site.

Why you need to know how to update your Drupal website

Updating your Drupal website is not rocket science. It’s something you can learn how to do on your own and avoid over-depending on your IT support staff, especially in times of crisis when reaching them is difficult.

Here are three reasons why being able to update your Drupal website is important.

1. Keeps you in control

Learning how to update your website quickly without IT support will make you in control over its look and feel. You’ll no longer need to make frantic calls for your site to be updated to meet the ever-changing user expectations.

With this level of control, you can unleash your inner creativity instantly and create whatever you want. So, whenever something unexpected happens, such as the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, you’ll still ensure your site is up-to-date and performing optimally.

2. Saves costs

Let’s face it: relying on an IT support team to be in charge of updating your site is expensive. If your website needs to be updated regularly, the costs can affect your bottom line, especially during the coronavirus pandemic when cash flow is limited.

Knowing how to update your website will reduce the costs spent on hiring a third-party service. You can use the savings to improve your core business activities and gain a competitive edge in the marketplace.

3. Improves skills

Another benefit of learning how to update your site is that it’ll improve your skills significantly. Updating your Drupal website is a skill that can be acquired easily with our Drupal Layout Builder. With the new skill, you’ll improve your capabilities to succeed in the current digital age.

We all know how technology is rapidly advancing these days. So, if you can add this expertise to your skillset, you’ll position yourself for personal and professional success.

How to update your Drupal website fast without IT support

As earlier mentioned, knowing how to update your website is easy to learn. With our Drupal Layout Builder for Drupal 7, 8, and 9, you can create and update your websites without touching any line of code.

DXPR offers an easy way to make improvements to your website without requiring IT support. It allows you to create and edit what you want lighting fast.

DXPR Builder is built to offer the benefits of an enterprise-class CMS solution without the usual pain points. It comes with simple and easy to use drag-and-drop functionality that makes building and updating web pages hassle-free and rewarding.

Many of our clients have been able to quickly update their website header, footer, homepage, or event pages, with a COVID-19 messages that stands out. Some clients have used our "Alert element" and other chose for more conspicuous "Jumbotron element".

Alert element example: Jumbotron element example: Conclusion

The COVID-19 pandemic has taught us lessons that we’ll live with for a long time to come. For Drupal website owners, it has exposed the importance of knowing how to make updates without relying on third-party services.

DXPR Builder has proved to be a viable solution to make the process of building and updating websites in Drupal fast, easy, and independent.




Photo by Markus Spiske from Pexels
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